April StartupQ8 Event with CFA Institute

CFA Society Kuwait in collaboration with StartupQ8Union of Investment Companies, Ajar,  and Sirdab Lab is holding a conference about Fintech (Tech startups in the Finance industry) on Monday the 24th of April as part of CFAI’s global “Putting Investors First” initiative.

Our main speaker, Saalim Chowdry, who is an Entrepreneur in Residence at 500 Startups, the world’s most active fintech investor, will be presenting “Fintech: What’s Next?” .

His talk will cover the following key questions:

• New developments in financial technology and what it means for asset managers and profitability

• What are the expected benefits and challenges of fintech on the industry?

• Who wins and who loses in a fintech-savvy world?

• Will big data and artificial intelligence change the model for investment research?

In addition Shaheen Al-Khudari, CEO of Ajar will be interviewed by Haider Al-Mosawi the CEO and cofounder of Sirdab Lab. The interview aims to explore the story behind Ajar Online, a Fintech startup that simplified the rent collection process for landlords and tenants, as well as to gain insights from the experiences of Shaheen Al-Khudari in entrepreneurship.

We look forward to seeing you there.

Date: Monday April 24th 2017

Venue: Kuwait Chamber of Commerce – Theatre – Ground Floor

Time: 6pm to 9pm

Agenda:

6-6:30 Registration and networking

6:30-7:30 Presentation & Q&A: Fintech what’s next? By Mr. Saalim Chowdhry

7:30-7:45 Break

7:45-8:45 Interview with Mr. Shaheen Al-Khudari

About Saalim Chowdry

Saalim Chowdhury is currently an Entrepreneur in Residence at 500 Startups. At 500 Startups he sources and evaluates startups for investment, as well as teaches and writes syllabi and content on several of the company’s growth programs globally. 500 Startups is the world’s most active Fintech investor according to CB Insights’ most recent report. He’s frequently a commentator on the changing world of professional services, and the impact of policy and regulation on growth and innovation. His key industry areas are Fintech (esp. blockchain & banking), enterprise, SaaS, media and entertainment.

 

Weekly one-on-one Advice Sessions with Abdulaziz

Abdulaziz AlLoughani (ex-partner at talabat.com and current Vice Chairman at Kuwait National Fund) is doing a weekly one-on-one advice sessions with entrepreneurs to give feedback on their startups and projects. That’s a free advice from one of the best minds in tech and business we have in Kuwait. I really appreciate what he is doing and I hope you all benefit from it. The meetings will be every Thursday, send an email directly to his email aballoughani(at)gmail.com to book your spot.

Good luck!

How to build a company that will last forever

Scale is important for startups to put them on the radar of strategic acquirers, which are a more likely route to an exit in MENA than listing on public markets.

But MENA is not a single market so regionalizing your business is a difficult and expensive achievement, although we’ve seen some notable names do it such as Careem, Souq.com and Anghami.

To achieve scale, and attract those strategic acquirers, you need sustainable growth rather than quick wins.

These are the elements that I believe are necessary for a company to get there, and if you don’t end up exiting you’ll have built a solid enterprise that will last forever.

1. Use the right growth metrics
Growth in product use and adoption is key to a startup’s valuation. Regardless of the vertical you’re in, your key performance metrics should always capture that as valuations for technology startups are more correlated to revenue/usage growth than any other financial metric. To put this in perspective, at Talabat a modest week for transaction growth was 7 percent week-on-week, and acquired for a more than 20x revenue multiple, versus market comparables of 10x at that time.

2. Show your regional scale through product adoption
Showing strong evidence of widespread product use and adoption at scale is the only evidence of your position as a regional startup, but it’s much harder to show high growth rates when your revenue/usage are large (when you hit about $5 million per five million users). Product/market fit at scale is how strategic investors gauge a company’s growth prospects.

3. Pick the right investors
To achieve long-term sustainable growth, access to smart capital through multiple rounds of financing is critical. Instead of spending half of your time trying to fundraise, resilient financial backing lets you focus on the business. The best regional example I can think of is Souq.com, whose institutional investors have supported the company’s growth through its different stages.

4. Understand unit economics
Understanding your costing structure and properly allocating your total costs on per transaction basis must be accurately captured in your unit economics. As you reach your Series A and B funding rounds, understanding your unit economics is important in order to have a sense of what your margins could look like when your business matures. Due to different business environments Talabat was operating in, we used separate unit economics for each country we operated in. Such reports gave a better understanding of how much incremental growth directly affected Talabat’s bottom line.

5. Have a large market
Strategic acquirers invest in companies that have a large market. A large market means that the company could reasonably become a large enterprise even without extremely high penetration of that market. At Talabat, the food ordering market size was at least 10 times our daily transactions, even after operating for 10 years when we were growing at over 7 percent week-on-week.

6. Know the competition
When you’re disrupting an industry, competing products should never be ignored. Understanding your market structure and how your startup fits into the broader market is key to building your ‘unfair advantage’ over direct and indirect competition.

7. One vision, multiple products
Strategic investors want companies that aren’t built around one product. It’s important for founders to look beyond the product they’re currently offering, to build a community of products. That’s why market-leading companies such as Facebook start with one core product and end with multiple products that ultimately serve the single core vision.

8. Be community leaders
Strategic investors want to invest in companies with leadership teams that are branded well in the ecosystem they operate in. Beyond the founders, your C-Suite executive team have to be known names in their field, to build the trust of strategic investors when they do reference checks.

9. Hire the right sales and marketing people
Strategic investors will want to see you’ve hired a proven head of product and marketing, and sales. That person/persons is important as you seek to address consumer needs as you scale, and help you develop new features and products in the long-run.

10. Doing good for the community
Make sure you give back to your community. Mentoring entrepreneurs, supporting coding schools and engineering departments at local universities, as well as startup initiatives and many other activities are important. Strategic investors understand the value of a community leader. It’s not a quantitative metric, but a brand value that the community appreciates.

11. Keep your accounts clean
Most startups are deeply involved around the product and often forget that finance is core to ensuring long-term sustainability. Maintaining healthy accounting books and producing financials in a timely manner will prepare you for the fiscal rigour required by strategic investors.

12. Provide the right work environment
It may seem more administration work to build a code of conduct, employee handbook and operational procedures, but is important to create the right environment in your workplace. Communicating the founders’ values and expectations to employees affects the startup’s ability to execute on its plans. During Talabat’s first five years, we always tried writing our playbooks ourselves, which tended to be brief. As we grew, proper policies and procedures were developed to ensure we had the same operational efficiency as when we were a six-member team, and provided new hires with the appropriate context for doing the job. We had a weekly breakfast where everyone from the business could attend which was a chance to embrace the company’s values and vision.

13. Don’t take legal shortcuts
Startups in our part of the world often take shortcuts in complying with the local laws, which is not attractive for strategic investors. An example we see regionally is that business licensing and jurisdiction regulations are often ignored: your startup can be registered in a free-zone that only allows you to do business in that jurisdiction, but your revenue actually comes from other jurisdictions. Taking legal short-cuts might save you some money in the short-run but as you achieve regional scale this will come at a cost to your company’s valuation at the time of acquisition.

14. Responsible governance
Assemble a board from your investors that challenges your vision and governs your practice, and attract experts who could technically and operationally help you improve the business. This strategy paid off well for Talabat at the time of exiting as a member of the board played an important role in negotiating with the acquirers.

 

Abdulaziz B. Al Loughani

aballoughani@gmail.com

twitter: @aballoughani

StartupQ8 Event – 25th of Jan

Hello everyone,

We are kicking off this year with a very special guest, Ihsan Jawad. Ihsan is a managing partner at MEVP and founder of Zawya.com (Bloomberg of the MENA region that was acquired by Reuters).

You shouldn’t miss this event if you want to learn how to build a successful startup and how to raise money in the region. Ihsan is also an investor in FishFishMe, Inc., so you’ll get some insider stories about that as well since I’ll be the person interviewing Ihsan in the event.

Event schedule – 25th of Jan

7:00pm – 8:00pm: Interview with Ihsan Jawad

8:00pm – 9:00pm: Networking

Venue: Global Tower (Kuwait City)

We will change the event structure starting from this event. Instead of having two talks, we will have one talk (something like an interview) and the second part will be networking. I usually hate networking because its always awkward to go talk to someone you don’t know! So we will do something more interesting than just tag names to make sure you get to meet everyone. Really looking forward for this event and it’s good to be back!

startupq8_jan_v0-2

ArabNet Kuwait gathered entrepreneurs around exciting panels and talks

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After lots of announcements about ArabNet conference, the event successfully landed to Kuwait for the first time. Arraya Ballroom was the place to be on October 4 and 5. There were representatives of many respectable companies, such as KNET, MasterCard, Twitter, Careem and many others. We were also there, wouldn’t miss such an event that brings us the opportunity to attend interesting panels and talks.

Well-known speakers and panelists

One of the major conference panels was the opening panel that gathered Kuwait’s leading entrepreneurship advocates – Abdulaziz B. Al Loughani (Vice Chairman at The National Fund for SMEs Development), Essa Al Essa (Chairman at Mefazec), Mohammad Alhajeri (Chief Investment Officer at Impulse International), Mohammad Jaffar (former CEO of Talabat) and Shafeeq Al-Saed Al-Omar, Assistant Undersecretary at Ministry of State for Youth Affairs. They discussed the digital ecosystem and what are the opportunities and obstacles for entrepreneurs here in Kuwait.

2016_10_11_hashim_bahbahani_arabnet_panel_startups

Hashim Bahbahani, co-founder of Coded and a member of StartupQ8 community, participated in a panel that was held during the second day of the conference. Charles Saliba (Founder and CEO at HR Works s.a.l.) and Meherzad Dastoor, (Senior Manager, People Advisory Services at Ernst & Young) joined him on the stage and discussed talent acquisition since that’s one of the biggest challenges startups face nowadays. They were also talking about challenges startups face, outsourcing or doing everything in-house, the best practices for hiring, training and retaining talent, which we all know it’s not very easy.

Who won the ArabNet Kuwait contests?

Aside from all ArabNet talks and panels, there were two contests. One of those was called Startup Demo Competition, where Meddy by Abdulla AlKhenji (Qatar) won the first place for an app that helps people find best doctors based on patient reviews and credentials. SoukDesigner by Kamel Kabbani (Lebanon) took the second place. It is an online platform that enables people to sell products in their personalized online store easily and economically. Third place went to Pricinity by Ahmad Al-Benali (Kuwait). It’s a search engine for products, prices and stores throughout Kuwait and the region.

2016_10_11_jaffer_mahdi_arabnet_ideathon_winner

Ideathon contest was won by Jaffer Mohamad Mahdi, the youngest participant at some ArabNet competition so far. With his idea called MySpot, he could actually help resolving one of the crucial problems in Kuwait – finding a parking spot.

2016_10_11_arabnet_team_organizers

We would like to thank the ArabNet team who worked very hard for the last couple of months to bring this event to Kuwait and gather entrepreneurs and startupers around awesome topics.

Make sure to be there next year!

Top 3 websites to learn coding

2016_07_03_coding_resources
With all available resources that we are surrounded by today, it’s easy to learn anything you want. Coding or programming, whatever you call it, is much easier to learn nowadays than 15 years ago. Video tutorials, online courses, you name it – knowledge is just a few clicks away thanks to easy access to the information.

Since Hamad Mufleh has been on all sides of software projects; as a client, manager, developer and UI/UX designer, we asked him to recommend few websites that he finds useful for people who want to learn coding.

  1. Codecademy

Codecademy is an online interactive platform that offers free coding classes in 11 different programming languages. Some of those are Python, Java, PHP, JavaScript (jQuery, AngularJS), Ruby, SQL, as well as markup languages HTML and CSS.  It’s free, and difficulty level is easy to intermediate. This website allows you to quickly and easily gain familiarity with a variety of coding languages with little to no prior experience. If you are a beginner, this is a good place for you.

  1. Code School

Code School is an online learning destination for existing and aspiring developers that teaches through entertaining content. Each course is built around a creative theme and storyline so that it feels like you’re playing a game, not sitting in a classroom. They combine gaming mechanics with video instruction and in-browser coding challenges to make learning fun and memorable. Code School offers almost 60 courses covering Ruby, JavaScript, HTML, CSS, iOS, Git, and databases. Their courses are more in-depth to train, they can turn you into an expert with the industry’s best practices. Difficulty level of Code School’s courses is intermediate to hard.

Some of their courses are free and some of them are $29 per month. If you decide to go with an annual plan, it will cost you $19 per month. They also have a blog where you can read interesting pieces of advice and helpful tips.

  1. Stack Overflow

Stack Overflow is a Q&A website site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It’s built and run by the community as part of the Stack Exchange network of Q&A sites. With the help of community members, they are working to build a library of detailed answers to every question about programming. On Stack Overflow you can use the tags or browse the lists of questions, or simply use the search box. It’s pretty sure you will find some solution to your coding problems there. If you don’t find what you needed, you can go directly into the chat rooms arranged according to languages and platforms.

You can start with those resources, or you can apply for Coded’s part-time bootcamp and become a professional full-stack developer in 14 weeks.

Dana Alfaraj: Why did I choose to work in a startup right after the graduation?

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After 23-year-old Kuwaiti Dana Alfaraj graduated from the American University of the Middle East in January 2016, she decided not to go with the flow and take some job in a public sector, but to start her career in a startup. She holds a bachelor’s degree in Industrial Engineering and is currently working as an intern at Ghinwa, a startup that won the first place at recently held MIT Enterprise Forum Arab Startup Competition.

StartupQ8: What (or who) motivated you to start your career in a startup and not in a public sector? When did you decide to do so?

Dana: Ever since I was young, I lived an ordinary life like any other teenager. Half way through college, I had a turning point because I realized that I don’t want to live the routine life anymore since it is not who I am. I have many ideas in my mind that I have the potential to accomplish, but I never had the courage to take action. I shifted my perspective of life and I started liking change and taking the risk of trying new things.

My mentor Mohammad AlMunaikh, who is the CEO of Ghinwa, had a huge role in motivating me to enter the world of startups and stepping out of my comfort zone. Before graduating in a month or two, I made up my mind to go for it. In both cases, if it turns good or bad, I’ll learn something from it. So far, I love it and believe that I fit there perfectly because I’m learning a lot in a very short time and I’m enjoying the experience.

StartupQ8: Since the team is based in Dubai, from where do you work?

Dana: I work remotely in Kuwait, but I fly to Dubai whenever I am needed there. In general, most of our meetings are via Skype. Though, there are few meetings that take place in Kuwait. Eventually, when I get the full time job, I’ll be moving to Dubai.

StartupQ8: What is the most challenging part of working in a startup?

Dana: For me, I think the most challenging part is that we are all in different locations. I find it a bit hard sometimes to communicate with the team through Skype or Slack all the time. Although, it is getting easier by time. I also didn’t meet the entire team yet. I would like to meet them and know more about the people I’m working with. This is my first official job and all the members of the team are well experienced. Sometimes, I find it challenging to catch up and be on their pace. The good thing is that I get to observe and learn from their experiences.

StartupQ8: Is there any piece of advice you would like to share with fresh graduates when it comes to choosing private sector over public sector?

Dana: People have different backgrounds and experiences. Some people might fit in the private sector rather than the public sector and vice versa. From my experience, the best advice I would give is to try new things and give it time to discover what you really passionate about to end up in the path that you love. Simply, choose the job that makes you sincerely happy, because it will lead you to gradually succeed in what you’re doing. Make sure you live the journey that you want and enjoy the ride.

We couldn’t agree more with Dana.

Did The Technology Industry Reach Its Plateau?

The Technology Hype

There is too much hype around staggering technology startup valuations, unicorns, Apple’s cash position, Alphabet’s vision, and many more. Most of what I hear and read is whether or not the technology industry reached a plateau. Partly the reasoning is the exaggerated valuations, sometimes lavish life style of few technology entrepreneurs, and whether we really want so much new features in our mobile devices, or augmented reality?!

The Scope of the Research

That’s a very broad subject, and I spent time researching various angles that can tackle some of the questions that arise towards the technology industry. In essence, I decomposed the questions I want to answer based on different stakeholders:

Venture Capitalists: Should we raise a new fund? Should we continue investing in more startups? Is there enough room for mergers and acquisitions activity so we exit our positions?

Entrepreneurs: Should I start a new tech startup? Doesn’t it seem a bit too much crowded now to start yet a new startup? Would the big boys with big bucks have any interest/capital in the next 5 years to buy out my startup?

Executives of tech companies: How much more room we have for growth? Can we still play the acquisition game to grow our market share?

Methodology

Obviously, those questions cannot be answered in a one page blog post. However, a simple yet data driven approach can give us amazing insights into answering them.

Business Consolidations

Industries go through four stages until they become so called “mature” or “stable”. Based on the article “The Consolidation Curve” in Harvard Business Review, the four stages are Opening, Scale, Focus, and Balance and Alliance.

Briefly describing, the article tackles the consolidation curve of industries by measuring the market share of the top 3 players of the industry.

  • Opening: A monopoly that soon vanishes and the top 3 players control between 10% to 30% of the market due to an influx of competitors.
  • Scale: Major players emerge and buy up competitors. Top 3 players control between 15% to 45% of the market.
  • Focus: Top 3 players focus on aggressive growth and control 35% to 70% of the market. Still 5 to 12 major players are around.
  • Balance and Alliance: The top 3 players control about 90% of the market and form alliances between themselves.

Current Market Analysis

So if we take that segmentation as a basis to find out how much the technology market has emerged, and how much growth can it still absorb, then what we need to find out is how the top 3 players of the technology market stack against the entire market.

Unicorns and Listed Companies

My assumptions going forward would be the following:

  1. The basis of the research is the United States market.
  2. Listed Technology companies in the NASDAQ market comprise all the publicly traded technology companies. Link to the list.
  3. Private technology companies that matter are the Unicorns, i.e. startups that reached beyond the $1 Billion valuation. Link to the list.

Total Addressable Market

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Top 3 Players of the Tech Market

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Scale Stage

Sum of the top 3 players’ market shares is: 27.9%. This puts the Technology industry into the second stage of scale based on HBR’s article.

So What Does This Mean?

To answer the questions we addressed at the beginning, we need to take a look at the scale stage. Here’s how it’s described based on HBR’s article:

Because of the large number of acquisitions occurring in this stage, companies must hone their merger-integration skills. These include learning how to carefully protect their core culture as they absorb new companies and focusing on retaining the best employees of acquired companies. Building a scalable IT platform is also crucial to the rapid integration of acquired firms. Companies jockeying to reach stage 3 must be among the first players in the industry to capture their major competitors in the most important markets and should expand their global reach.

This describes the rapid M&A activity by large players trying to acquire as much good startups as possible to ensure their own survival. In summary, the answers to the questions would be:

Venture Capitalists: Should we raise a new fund? Should we continue investing in more startups? Is there enough room for mergers and acquisitions activity so we exit our positions?

Answer: In short: Yes. There is still room. However, funds should predict the estimated timing of stage 3 of the market. VCs should focus on growth startups in the industry’s transitioning phase into the third stage. Reason why is that the big players won’t have enough time to buy out startups at early stages and can only accommodate growth startups that will immediately add to their top lines and make fast synergies with their businesses.

Entrepreneurs: Should I start a new tech startup? Doesn’t it seem a bit too much crowded now to start yet a new startup? Would the big boys with big bucks have any interest/capital in the next 5 years to buy out my startup?

Answer: While entrepreneurship is always encouraged, and one should be dedicated to growing his/her company, I think with the tech scene becoming too crowded, tech entrepreneurs should have a solid idea regarding their possible exit strategy to one of the major players in the technology scene. That may seem trivial but from personal experience, I see lots of startup founders tackling legitimate problems but not having an idea about their exit strategy. Also, it does not necessarily mean that the exit synergy should ONLY be with Apple, Google, or Microsoft. Although these three are the giants, other major players are still very legitimate options since the industry hasn’t gone through the third stage yet.

Executives of tech companies: How much more room we have for growth? Can we still play the acquisition game to grow our market share?

Answer: Yes. There is plenty of room to grow. 27.9% of the market is way behind the 90% mark. However, acquisitions should be targeted smartly in various verticals in the sense that not only adds to the top line directly, but also makes it harder for the competitors to join that specific vertical. In short, release products and acquire startups revolving around the product to make the barriers for entry in that product’s vertical harder bracing for an aggressive competition in stage 3.

The Rise of “Community”

5 years ago, there were a number of entrepreneurial initiatives in Kuwait that large sums of money were allocated to but were operating independently of each other. A few governmental programs were servicing funding needs through both debt and equity instruments but nevertheless did not cover other building blocks of the entrepreneurial ecosystem, to name a few here is a list:

  • Kuwait Small Projects Development Company
  • Industrial Bank of Kuwait
  • AlRaeda Enterprises
  • KAMCO

 

Half (approximately) of the allocated funds for these programs were earning interest from deposits and the other half typically funded traditional businesses, with no focus on knowledge based economy. However, the SMEs scene in Kuwait was still quite active relative to the rest of the GCC and a majority of small businesses and startups were funded by private money (friends & family) through traditional funding terms.

 

On the consulting side, there were a lot of boutiques that offered relatively expensive consultations (to the size of businesses being established) and a few were more entrepreneurial friendly in pricing. Here is a list to name a few:

  • AlMubadir
  • Cubical Services
  • Traditional accounting/consulting firms
  • Manpower and Restructuring Program

 

Challenges

Beyond the abovementioned services, entrepreneurs were very much self-dependent (hustlers) and have been struggling with the following key issues:

  • Excessive regulations: It is very challenging to start a business in Kuwait as the licensing requirements and procedures are quite complicated, they take a lot of the entrepreneur’s time to start and maintain rather than focusing on the business 100%.
  • Attracting and maintaining talent is hindered by the strong benefits that the government offers and by the generous labor law rules and regulations with very restrictive immigrant labor permits.
  • Being the largest procurer, Government business penetration is very challenging and is predominantly taken by large corporations and family offices.
  • Access to private finance is limited as most private financial institutions do not view the SME/Venture asset class strategically and the Central Bank’s interest spread cap of 400 basis points is prohibiting high risk taking.
  • Support programs are nascent whether its incubation services, grant schemes, mentoring, business development services, there are a handful of programs with limited capacity.
  • The mindset and culture stand against encouraging modern entrepreneurship. Entrepreneurs are directly encouraged to take a risk-averse mindset and no sense of community exists.

 

Territory marking

With that said, there were a few startups in different industries that were marking Kuwait on the regional map, to name a few in the technology sector: Talabat, Koutbo6, KuwaitNet and many others in different sectors.

 

Infrastructure & market

During those years, government has invested heavily in telecom and internet infrastructure enabling residents and offices to benefit from fiber optic cabling in most areas around Kuwait. As the price of technology access was also witnessing a significant decline, penetration of internet became much more affordable and the bandwidth was only getting better and cheaper. The Apples of the world were causing huge software and hardware disruptions, making the quality and ease of using technology more accessible/useable than ever. The connectivity and efficiency only drove the world to be more connected through brilliant platforms and hardware and everything around the world was only a click away from everyone. Smartphone penetration climbed up the charts and Telecoms focused more on VAS for their customers, as voice calls became a utility.

 

Changes in Local Landscape

Kuwait LandscapeIn the past 5 years, the Lean Startup school of thought became more global and standardized the startup’s lifecycle, early stage funding methods and tools were becoming more visible. As a result of funding gap challenges we had in Talabat.com, my partner and I started setting up a late stage VC practice in 2012 that evolved into a larger project on a national level (the National Fund for SMEs Development), and several institutions started exploring the rising asset class (Venture Capital) where international private funds started flowing into the ecosystem (i.e. Talabat.com) and incubators/co-working spaces started blooming. Individuals (including myself and many others)/family offices/corporates continued to invest in the asset class and the funding gap is much smaller in size than it used to be. Startup competitions (local and international) were happening and developers/designers became more in demand. Despite not having a tax-break policy for non-profit initiatives in Kuwait, non-profit startup initiatives became very popular and the calendar year started filling up with many events in the startup world. Here is an overview of how the local landscape looks like today.

 

Community

If we look at the above table, a super majority of these initiatives are led by entrepreneurs, not government and not corporates (I‘m sure there are more efforts which I missed in the list). These are striving entrepreneurs who are giving us a sense of a real community that is shaping the future of our country’s startup ecosystem. As Brad Feld repeatedly mentions in his “Startup Communities” book, “entrepreneurs always lead the community” and this is exactly what we’re witnessing in Kuwait. There is a new culture of openness and information exchange between entrepreneurs that none of the earlier generations ever witnessed. Mentoring has become more standard and the notion of protecting your idea is gradually becoming obsolete. With more than 60% of the population less than the age of 35, the landscape is only starting to shape right now with much more efforts being geared for the community. There is a very important role for corporates and government to play but ultimately, the community has to continue being led by entrepreneurs who should streamline other stakeholders’ efforts for their benefit.

20 years ago, our flagship startup was Sakhr and we had Talabat conquering the marketplace model for the GCC in the past 10 years… all of that without 10% of the resources currently available for the community. Can you imagine what the next 10 years can produce for the local startup community? IT CAN ONLY GET BETTER!

 

 

Abdulaziz B. Al Loughani

@aballoughani

Announcing Coded’s Spring Coding Bootcamp

Folks,

We all know how hard it is to find a talented coder to hire or be your co-founder. So sometimes, the best thing to do is to go learn the technical stuff yourself. In the least, mastering the fundamentals of programming helps you  communicate with your technical team, and be more valuable to the product building process.

There’s no doubt that the time and effort you invest in your coding education will pay dividends for your startup in one way or another.

If you’re looking for a place to learn how to code, Coded, Kuwait’s first and only coding bootcamp, has announced earlier this week that they are accepting applications for the Spring coding bootcamp.

Coded Bootcamp Announcement

The bootcamp is aimed at beginners who want to become professional programmers. Coded students graduate as junior level professional coders.

The Spring bootcamp, which starts in March, is an intensive part-time bootcamp with 4 hours of class every weekday (5m to 9m), and lasts 14 weeks. The part-time format makes it easy for those who have a full-time commitment in the day time to join the bootcamp in the evening.

The application deadline is Feb 7th, 2016.

You can check it out and apply on joincoded.com 

 

Good luck!

 

 

 

 

 

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