500Startups here we come!

I’d like to announce that fishfishme.com joined 500Startups batch 13 in Mountain View, CA. The program kicked off last Monday 20th of April. If you don’t know what’s 500Startups, then you can watch the video here:

500Startups invests $100K in startups selected in addition to a 4 months program. During the program they help startups improve their product, marketing channels and raise money.

Some back story about our journey since we arrived here. Jose (my co-founder), Christian (our designer) and I arrived in San Francisco on the 18th of April. We are staying at Blackbox office/house in Palo Alto renting a couple of rooms. It’s perfect for us with a reasonable price compared to rest of the options. If you don’t remember what’s Blackbox, here is a post and video to refresh your memory:

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You need to know that rent in this area (Palo Alto, Mountain View and surrounding areas) is crazy! An apartment for 3 people will cost more than 3,500USD and most probably not furnished.

500Startups office is in Mountain View. To get there we go by train (a 10min ride). The round trip cost something around 5USD by train. You’ll think a city like Palo Alto, were most tech companies started and has Stanford University, will have the most advanced public transportation. But, that’s not really the case. We take the train every morning, and you’ll need to check the schedule because it usually arrives twice or once every hour. So you need to plan when to go to the train station. Moreover, you need to buy a card to tag on and tag off every time you use the train, which is fine, but if you forget to do so you lose all of the money you had in the card (which of course happened to us!). To be fair it’s not completely bad, it’s just your expectation for such high tech city is much higher.

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Clipper, I hate you!

Once we arrive at Mountain View station we walk for 10min to 500 office which is located in the highest building in Mountain View called Mountain Bay Plaza building and 500 office is on the 12th floor. 500 office and here you feel that you are in a high tech office. First of all to open the main door we use an app called Lockitron. You press a unlock button and tada, the door is opened. The office is huge and divided into open working offices, open area for events and closed meeting rooms. I love it! You can see the full city form the top. The best part is that drinks (coffee and soft drinks) and snacks are free! For lunch meals we get two free meals per week, and we order them online from Eat Club. Each startup has it’s own desk, and some have bigger desk than others depending on team size.

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The program kicked off on the 20th of April. And to be honest the amount of effort put into it and the things we will be getting is beyond my expectations. For us the best value is that we get assigned with two main offices one is called POC and the other person is called Distro-POC. I honestly forgot what POC stands for, but basically is a person that will help us during the whole period and his main job is to help us with our business, strategy, hiring and fund raising. The POC also help us with connecting us with the best person to help us with a specific subject. The Distro person is only focused to help us grow our company. For us our case grow number of bookings. Disro stands for Distribution and that includes marketing and sales. Our POC is Zafer, a fellow friend I previously met in Dubai, but didn’t know that he joined 500Startups. Very cool guy and I’m happy to working with for the next 4 months and beyond. Our Destiro POC is Mathew Johnson and the head of 500Distro team (yes, we are lucky to get the head working with us). So far these guys been amazing and already helped to open our eyes on new things and to focus on the things that will have bigger effect on us.

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The team that help startups is huge, and if I counted correctly is more than 20 people focused to help startup batch. Most of 500 team is focused on growth and distribution. There are also some entrepreneur in residents and VC partners that work full time to help startups to raise money and to overcome business problems. I’ll do a future post about each department job and how they help startups.

Each week at 500 we have a theme such as legal week, hiring, product and Hell Marketing week. Talks and mentors are invited to give talks and lectures. Startups don’t need to attend all talks, unless they think they need it. That’s good, because startups in different stages will need different things.

So far the program is great and we feel lucky to be here. They say it only gets better with time, so will keep you posted. Next post will be about startups with us in the program, will interview some of them and post about their stories. Stay tuned.

Coverage of the 8th MIT Enterprise Forum – A few pictures

A few pictures of the participants and judging phases of the 8th MIT Enterprise Forum Arab Startup Competition that took place in Kuwait, April, 2015.

Credit and special thanks to Mariam Al-Rayes and the MIT EF Pan Arab organizing team for the pictures and for putting together truly inspiring, thought provoking, and informative event.

Coverage of the 8th MIT Enterprise Forum – Day 2: How We Move Forward

The agenda for the second (and, unfortunately, final) day of the 8th MIT Enterprise Forum in Kuwait promised a wealth of ideas, speakers, and inspiration.

I can safely report that it did not disappoint one bit.

The morning session kicked off with the ever ingenious Dr. Naif Almutawa, creator of “The 99″ (the first group of comic superheroes born of an Islamic archetype). Dr. Naif seldom ends a talk without leaving the crowd thirsty for more, and this time was no different. The clinical psychologist’s talk highlighted the importance of mentorship as it relates to leadership. In essence, he delivered the message that “every leader needs a mentor”. From the onset of this forum and the Arab Startup Competition, this idea has been the undisclosed theme of the event. Dr. Naif’s talk helped resonate that idea even further.

 

Following Dr. Naif was a panel on the role of private business in supporting the startup ecosystem. Zain Group’s CEO Scott Gegenheimer and Ericsson VP Patrik Melander led the panel. I was pleasantly surprised to find out about the initiatives both Zain and Ericsson were working on to support connectivity in rural areas; something that will have a big impact on the potential market for any startup. I was also surprised to find out that Zain had an initiative in Jordan that acted as an accelerator for statups (called ZINC), and that they were planning on rolling it out in more cities across MENA. In the QA, a few members of the audience voiced their opinion that these private companies have benefited from government support and public infrastructure, and it was their duty to support startup initiatives even more. I completely agree.

 

I was looking forward to the panel on Access to Capital in MENA, which hosted leaders of the VC industry in the Arab world. The panel discussion was thought provoking. The panel’s message was heard loud and clear, “there is a lack of capital flowing into the tech scene in MENA”. There was one stat in particular that I found surprising: in the US, 5% of capital is invested in technology and startups, compared to 0.1%-0.6% in MENA. The panel called for more openness to startup failure, and a shift in risk assessment in light of the dwindling opportunities in traditional low-risk investment vehicles such as real estate. The discussion was an important insight into the availability of capital for startups.

 

The other two panels I would like to highlight were on creating a knowledge economy and the long-term energy outlook for the region (attended by Mr. Nizar Al-Adsani, CEO of KPC). The goal of both panels was to look forward and see where the Arab world was heading. The falling oil prices has been a topic of debate among participants, and it was intriguing to find out what perspective Mr. Al-Adsani had to offer. One sentence Al-Adsani mentioned struck me in particular, “Oil at $60 is an opportunity”. Perhaps now more than ever, the technology sector has a chance to prove itself as a true cornerstone of a thriving economy. With oil continuing its fall from grace, there is room for new sectors to shine and show the way forward. Ultimately, the technology sector is about the entrepreneurs who are courageous and talented enough to take a chance on creating the next global giant.

 

The Arab startup community needs to rally today more than ever to showcase the plethora of original ideas and abundance of ingenuity to pave the true alternative to an economy overly dependent on oil. That was the message and call of action for the way forward.

 

As MITEF came to an end, I couldn’t help but feel a renewed optimism coursing through my veins. I am now sure, more than I have ever been, that leaders on all levels and across all segments are embracing the need to support the startup ecosystem in the Arab world. My hope is that this continuous drive will reap it’s rewards in the very near future.

 

Special thanks to MIT and the organizers for putting together a terrific event. And special thanks to Mariam Alrayes for allowing us the pleasure of covering the forum.

 

(Reminder: pictures of the entire event will be posted soon… stay tuned!)

 

 

 

Coverage of the 8th MIT Enterprise Forum – Day 1: Awards and Panels

The 8th MIT Enterprise Forum officially got underway last night in Kuwait. From the opening speech delivered by MC Talal Malik, I could feel the crowd growing in anticipation for what was to come (especially the startup teams who were waiting for the announcement of the Arab Startup Competition winners!).

 

The forum kicked off with a fireside chat between Hala Fadel (Chair, MITEF panArab) and Mr. Mohammad Abulaziz Alshaya (Executive Chairman, M.H. Alshaya Co.). Alshaya’s success story, dating back to his grandfather in the late 1800’s, was truly inspiring. It was very apparent in Alshayaa’s answers how confident he was in Arab youth and what they could aspire to be. He continuously underscored three important factors for realizing success:

Passion

Curiosity

Hard work

 

For me, the highlight of the chat was Alshaya’s belief that “government should stop guaranteeing jobs”, pointing out that such policy kills motivation among youth, especially in the GCC.

 

Next on the agenda was the Panel titled “The Missing Link: From Startup to Global Powerhouse”. The main topic of discussion was underlining the required infrastructure and mentality for startups to grow into global industry leaders. On the panel were Sheikha Al-Zain Al-Sabah, Mohammad Jaffar (former CEO of Talabat), Tarek Sultan (CEO at Agility), and Hala Fadel.

 

The different backgrounds of the panelists made for an extremely insightful discussion.

 

From a governmental and infrastructural perspective, Al-Sabah believes that there needs to be disruption and reconfiguration in the way government supports the startup ecosystem. She called for youth to provide change from the inside.

Jaffar, who lead Talabat from a local player to a regional powerhouse, believes that entrepreneurs must possess an extraordinary work ethic and commitment. He also stressed the importance of remaining transparent, honest, and socially responsible; three factors to which he accredits a lot of Talabat’s success

From a Kuwaiti global company’s perspective, Agility’s CEO Tarek Sultan pointed out the strategic significance of understanding where you come from as a company, and what that entails in terms of limitations and opportunities. He remarked that Agility’s global success stemmed from its fundamental understanding of the market in initially operated in, and then building upon that.

 

By the end of both panels, I was left feeling extremely optimistic that the startup ecosystem would continue to flourish in the Arab world because today’s leaders are willing to instigate and adapt change and disruption.

 

At the end of the night, the winners of the MITEF Arab Startup Competition were announced, as follows:

 

Startups Track: Colorbug- UAE (First Place), Project IO- Jordan (Second Place), ScreenDy- Morocco (Third Place)

Ideas Track: Kotobna- Egypt (First Place), ConCure- KSA (Second Place), Nano Ebers- Egypt (Third Place)

Social Entrepreneurship Track: Visualizing Impact- Lebanon, Tahrir Academy- Egypt, La Perle de la Mer- Morocco

 

Congratulations to all the winners, who were all truly outstanding.

 

Catch our coverage of the second (and last day)) of the forum tomorrow!

 

Pictures from the entire duration of the event will be posted soon in a different post (as soon as we get them, we promise).

 

 

 

Coverage: 8th MIT Enterprise Forum – Arab Startup Competition Elevator Pitch Day

Kuwait is currently hosting the 8th version of the MIT Enterprise Forum hosted and organized by MIT.

The forum centers around the MITEF Arab Startup Competition.

Here is a quick brief on the competition:

Startups from all over the Arab world apply towards three possible “tracks”: idea track (for pre-prototype venture), social entrepreneurship track (for startups that tackle a social problem), or the startup track.

From the applicants, 150 startups are selected to attend the semi finals in Kuwait, of which a handful will be selected to participate in the final. The winners are awarded funding as follows:

Startups Track: $50K for the first winner, $15K for the second winner, and $10K for the third winner

Ideas Track: $15K for the first winner, $10K for the second winner, and $5K for the third winner

Social Entrepreneurship Track: 3 winners winning $10K each

The semi-final was held on Sunday (April 19th), and the StartupQ8 team was there to cover it! Our team was also on elevator pitch judging duty.

For the elevator pitch exercise, Startups were instrcuted to pitch (one-on-one) to as many EP judges as possible and gather feedback. The judges (selected from different disciplines and backgrounds) provided succinct feedback and an overall rating for the startups.

A couple of minutes before the elevator pitch exercise got underway, the ballroom was already buzzing with almost tangible energy. Hundreds of founders were ready to bombard the vast array of judges with their extraordinary startup ideas to eagerly collect some valuable feedback.

For the next 90 minutes, startups circulated the room and engaged in insightful conversation with judges. The variety and diversity of ideas was truly incredible. The mix of having startups at different stages as well as ones with a social impact agenda made for a more compelling competition, with Arab ingenuinty on full display.

Of the startups that I was lucky enough to get to know, I’d like to highlight the following three as my personal favorite:

ScreenDy: a web platform for creative native advanced e-commerce apps on the cloud. It allows web developers with little to no background in mobile development to create a brilliant mobile app. I took some time to checkout the platform and found it intuitive and uncomplicated. The team, from Casablanca, is very experienced and extremely capable of executing a world class product.

Braille Touch: an idea for a glove that allows visually impaired people to interact and read digital text content on any screen. What I love about this idea is the sense of mission the founders have. I could immediately tell the amount of passion behind the idea, and I was left feeling confident that they had the team to turn this idea into a beautiful product.

ColorBug: this mobile applications turns color-in stencil into augmented reality for children. The technology is jaw-dropping (literally, in my case) and the app has an overall “wow” factor. But what I really like about this startup is the market potential. They have impressive sales for the short amount of time they have been operating, and they understand exactly how to tackle such a massive market. They are already affiliating themselves with big sponsors in the children education space.

There were other great startups that I didn’t have the chance to find out more about. Let’s hope I get some time to talk to them in the coming days and share my thoughts on them here.

The finalist from each track have been chosen, and the winners will be announced in the forum/ gala dinner event starting tonight (April 20).

Stay tuned for our coverage!

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Failure: The Cornerstone of a Successful Startup Community

This article appeared in Khaleejesque Magazine, ECONOMICS Issue, published March, 2015. A PDF copy of the article is available here. It is published on this blog with the consent of the author and magazine. All credits and copyrights are reserved to Khaleejesque, 2015. Click here to subscribe to Khaleejesque, or follow them on Instagram @Khaleejesque 

Author: Hashim Bahbahani

Print Artwork: Khaleejesque Team

4 min read.

I paused momentarily as I stood outside the meeting room, took a deep breath, tightened my left hand grip on my laptop briefcase, exhaled, and slowly turned the door handle to enter what I knew would be the last-ever meeting for our startup. There was only one item on the agenda: shutting down.

Even as I took my seat at the meeting table and drew a sip out of what seemed to be the blandest cup of coffee I have ever tasted, I thought one more time about reversing my decision to end our startup venture. In truth, I had spent more than a month agonizing over this decision. I fully understood the cold facts: our e-commerce platform for small businesses was not gaining enough traction or engagement, we were out of money, and we had little to show for after three years of trial and error.

But I also understood that shutting down our startup meant that I had to publicly admit failure and live with all the ramifications such an admission entailed. That, above all, was my source of agony.

In the Gulf region, thousands of startups founded by ambitious entrepreneurs have to deal with facing failure. Failure, after all, is the more likely scenario for a startup, statistically speaking.  This fact is fully embraced in developed startup ecosystems, where failure is celebrated and thought of as a rite of passage for entrepreneurs. In Silicon Valley, for example, “Fail Fast” is a divine mantra meant to encourage startups to rapidly try everything possible to make an idea successful, admit failure if it doesn’t work, learn from the experience, and take those lessons forward to the next venture.

This definition is a stark contrast to how failure is perceived in the Gulf region. Abdullah Asiri, founder and CEO of Saudi based startups ShopMate and Waqood Tech, remarks: “In global tech hubs, true failure is defined as stopping after the first unsuccessful try. If you don’t learn from the lessons of your first experience and apply them to the next startup (or the one after that), it renders the first attempt pointless. In mature startup economies, there is a lot of encouragement to openly discuss your failure in order to dissect it and learn as much as possible from it, and then try again.”

Asiri believes this encouragement is absent in the Gulf startup scene because there is a heavy punishment for failure.

“Here (in the GCC), it is very difficult for entrepreneurs to try again in a new startup because the backlash they confront from society after their first failure makes it unbearable to take another chance and risk facing such societal pressure again,” Asiri continues. “Moreover, investors here become much less inclined to invest with you if you have previous failures. In short, this pressure and punishment inhibit an unsuccessful attempt from becoming a learning experience. It makes failure permanent.”

Asiri’s comment on investor behavior in the Gulf region is critical. Venture Capital (capital invested in new or expanding businesses in which there is substantial risk) is the bloodline of any startup ecosystem. While society plays an important role in encouraging a tolerance of failure, venture capitalists (VC’s) and angel investors (an individual investor who invests in high risk, high growth businesses) have the biggest impact. If investors refuse to invest in a startup because of the past failures of its founders, then those investors are tangibly punishing failure.

In order to further understand how investors in the GCC, both corporate and individual, react to past failures from entrepreneurs, I spoke with Mona Al-Mukhaizeem, co-founder of Kuwaiti startup accelerator Sirdab Lab, and an angel investor herself.

“Investors in the Gulf are accustomed to low risk investments, such as real estate or debt bonds. They have limited tolerance for failure,” Al-Mukhaizeem remarked. “A strong Venture Capital firm or angel investor must possess a different mentality; one that is more realistic about the risk of failure for startups. Without such investor mentality, capital will never flow into the GCC startup economy.”

However, Al-Mukhaizeem, who has experience with VC’s in Silicon Valley, believes that there’s a gradual shift in the way investors in the region evaluate startups: “There is a new breed of angel investors and VC’s in the Gulf region who understand that nine times out of ten startups will fail. But the impact and reward from that one successful startup more than makes up for the shortcomings of those unsuccessful ventures.  Thus, this new generation of investors is willing to give promising startup teams multiple chances to succeed. It’s a very important change towards building a successful startup community.”

Al-Mukhaizeem has also noticed through her heavy involvement in Sirdab Lab and the GCC startup scene that founders who fail are finding more support and encouragement.

“In the past, we saw founders clinging on to floundering startups because they did not want to be portrayed as failures by their friends, family, and peers. However, as a sense of community and togetherness fosters in the startup community, more people are sharing their experiences with failed businesses. An optimal learning curve is only achievable if entrepreneurs have the chance to learn from their own mistakes, as well as the mistakes of others,” concluded Al-Mukhaizeem.

Fundamentally, startups are experiments of innovation. As is the nature of innovation, there must be multiple attempts before success is realized. For multiple attempts to occur, society, investors, and entrepreneurs have to perceive failure as a step in the learning ladder. As the Gulf community gradually shifts towards a “fail well, fail fast, try again” mentality, a more impactful and inventive startup community will thrive. Lest we forget, Edison burnt a thousand light bulbs before one finally lit up the world.

This article appeared in Khaleejesque Magazine, ECONOMICS Issue, published March, 2015. A PDF copy of the article is available here. It is published on this blog with the consent of the author and magazine. All credits and copyrights are reserved to Khaleejesque, 2015. Click here to subscribe to Khaleejesque, or follow them on Instagram @Khaleejesque 

New Blog in Town

There is a new blog in the block called beopen.me. Its a mix of news (Tech and non-tech) and thought sharing platform in Arabic and English started by a good friend Ali Al Nusif and his co-founder Jasim Al Qames. Below is a better description about what the blog is about by Ali:

Open is an open blogging and aggregation bi-lingual thought platform. It aims to bring interesting thoughts from individual contributors to create thought provoking conversations among the connected generation, while also bringing interesting articles from all over the world that caters to the interests of the smart reader providing insight and context to a lot of issues happening around us in the world.
The idea came about while noticing that there is no platform that chronicles the interests and thoughts of the connected generation in the Arab world. Websites are usually news and politics websites, while there are hardly any that talk about how we feel, think, and what our interests are.
We believe that we’re going through exciting times. We are living the information revolution that is changing our lives in one of the most vibrant and changing parts of the world; the Middle East. We think that a platform like Open would allow us to capture the essence of this amazing era through the thoughts and interests of its generation.

Why you need a cofounder (a personal story)

I’d like to share a personal story about how it took me 3 years to start Sirdab Lab.

While doing my MBA in San Francisco, I got a chance to work closely with startups in an amazing accelerator program. I fell in love with the energy of the people and the fast progress they were making in short time periods.

I decided that I want to start something similar in Kuwait. When I came back to Kuwait I spoke to one of my smartest friends, who was also interested in startups, and convinced him to work together on this. It took us a year of planning, but we didn’t move forward. I think the reason for this is that we came from the same professional background.

I joined Ernst & Young (EY) and almost gave up on starting Sirdab Lab. Then I met Abdullah Al-Sayer, founder of MrBabu.com, at Thukhur. My interest in working with startups rekindled, but it remained a passion without action.

In the 2014 Benchmark Forum I met Haider Al-Mosawi, a UX designer, who shared my passion for helping startups and providing the community with comprehensive support. We shared the same vision and spotted the same problems.

I asked Abdullah and Haider to join me as cofounders in building Sirdab Lab as a startup hub in Kuwait. They both agreed, and we started to execute on that vision. Each of the cofounders has unique skills that complement one another.

Being a startup founder is insanely demanding and incredibly stressful. It’s almost impossible to get started on your own, let alone building your startup and seeing it through to success. Most accelerator programs only accept startups with a minimum of two cofounders, because they know how hard it is for solopreneurs and it’s too risky to invest in them.

So if you’re serious about your startup, you need a cofounder. Don’t have one? Then I highly recommend you join our Co-Founder Speed Dating event this Wednesday. Follow the link below for more details.

http://sirdab-lab.com/speeddating

With the Co-Founder Speed Dating event, the first in Kuwait, Sirdab Lab aims to provide a platform to connect entrepreneurs and people with talent (designers, coders, hustlers) through smart and efficient networking.

How does it work?

Entrepreneurs will be seated at tables arranged in a circular setting while people with talent (designers, hustlers, coders) rotate. Each entrepreneur and person with talent will have 3 minutes to introduce themselves and pitch their idea and skills to each other. Once the buzzer rings, the person with talent moves to the next entrepreneur.The speed dating will be followed by mingling over snacks.

When?

6:30 PM, Wednesday

18th March, 2015

Entry Fee (includes food and beverages)

Sirdab Lab members: KD 8

Non-members: KD 10

Where do I sign up?

To register, please visit: http://sirdab-lab.com/speeddating

“How is business going?”

Almost every day I pump into someone (a friend, a fellow entrepreneur, someone I don’t even know) and they ask me “how is business going?”. It’s a very tricky question to ask for a startup founder. Things at a startup are 90% of the time going bad. I used to hide from my parents to avoid answering this question!

So how to answer this question?

99% of the answers I get if I personally asked this question to another founder “very well” or “Great!”, then after few months I hear that the startup is shutting down!!  I used to do the same, my answer was always “great” but now I changed. My answer depends on who is asking me the question.

If an entrepreneur is asking me then I tell the truth as it is, I usually answer “it sucks” at difficult times. You need to understand that a founder will actually not be happy to know that you are doing great while his startup is falling apart. Even if your startup is doing amazing and the founder of a startup that is doing bad asks you “how is business” tell him “is doing ok”.

Its a tough life and we as entrepreneurs only have each other to talk to because the rest of the world just don’t get how difficult our life is. If you said you are doing fantastic then the conversation is stopped here and the person will do the same and the conversion is done. But if you said “trying to stay alive” the conversation will be different and he will probably say “same here” and you will start talking about your struggles, at least you’ll not feel lonely.

As I said my reply depends on who I’m talking to, below some examples:
My parents: Very good
Non-entrepreneur friends: all good, we did this and we did that, things are very promising
Investors: amazing, soon will be millionaires
Startup founders: sucks, surviving, trying to stay alive, ok, not bad

Next time a fellow entrepreneur asks you how is things, its ok to tell him that things are pretty bad, you’ll both feel good about it.

Most events are a waste of time!

As you might know, I’m now living in Dubai and there are tons of events for startups every week and almost in a daily basis. To be honest most of the events are a waste of time. Focus in building your business better than you go to events. The worst events (aka conferences) are the ones that you need to travel to go to them. Such a big waste of time and money! Especially the ones that convince you that you’ll find investors, pitch your idea and give you a booth to meet media and PR. These events are now everywhere around the world and most of them are just waste of time and a big distraction.

It’s rare to find an event were I learn something useful that I can use in real life. Most of them have a fancy title and when you go you find the talk is pretty general and you end up learning nothing!

Of course not all events are a waste of time, especially if you know what you want to take out of them. For example Mix N Mentor from Wamda is pretty good, especially if you are a new startup. It’s a good opportunity to meet interesting people that might help you with your startup and great way to find mentors and advisors. If you are going to a talk about for example SEO, and the speaker is super amazing then yeah maybe you can learn something there. Or if the event is a great way to find customers, then hell yeah, you probably should attend. Heavy technical events are pretty good as well if you are looking for a technical co-founder or a potential hire.

One more example when events become useful is when you are in a new city or town and you need to build your network quickly, then yeah events are pretty useful. Go to as many as you can until the faces get repeated then you know that you have a good network and you can stop going to them.

I’m saying that and I’m the founder of StartupQ8 Event, so controversial right! Well, if you are a startup and between attending the event and working on your startup, then I’d recommend you check what is the subject of the event and who are the speakers. If it’s not interesting enough then don’t come, no issues, we understand that you should focus in your startup. It’s a challenge for us, we need to make the content of the event super useful so that it is worth your time. Moreover, we are very sensitive to time, if you are a regular StartupQ8 attendee you’ll realize we always start on time and finish on time even if Obama is going to speak at our event!

In short, events are over rated and sucks most of the time; don’t go to them unless you know exactly what you want to get out of them.

If you disagree please write in the comments, will love to hear your feedback :)

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